One of the best ways is by mentoring – helping others develop their career. Being a mentor is a satisfying way to ‘give back’, but it’s less well recognised what an extraordinary learning and development experience it can be for both parties in the exchange. As well as the satisfaction of helping others, WIBF mentors all report how much they have learned from their mentees. The experience often gives them more diverse perspectives, as well as unexpected insights into other areas of life and work.
WIBF Mentoring
WIBF Mentoring
Spotlight on Tesco Bank

Denzel Washington, one of the English language’s greatest actors, is a fearsome promoter of mentoring, and attributes to it his own successes.

How can you use your knowledge and experience to the greatest effect? One of the best ways is by mentoring – helping others develop their career. Being a mentor is a satisfying way to ‘give back’, but it’s less well recognised what an extraordinary learning and development experience it can be for both parties in the exchange. As well as the satisfaction of helping others, WIBF mentors all report how much they have learned from their mentees. The experience often gives them more diverse perspectives, as well as unexpected insights into other areas of life and work.

Hand-matched together by WIBF, mentoring partners meet regularly – at a time that suits them – to work on an individual’s goals and how best to reach them. Our monitoring shows just how productive those encounters can be.

If you would be interested in becoming the Denzel Washington of the finance world, bringing your own organisation’s skilled mentors to the table, we are now looking for new relationship managers like Victoria to volunteer. Her contact details are below.

Stars of The Show

Our mentors and corporate partners all achieve wonders. However, we’ve made Tesco Bank a case study, as it happens to be where one of our most enthusiastic promoters works, our co-chair of mentoring, Victoria Pringle.

Victoria has evidently used her skills of persuasion well, as the bank currently contributes 31% of WIBF’s mentor volunteers. This is the highest proportion contributed by our corporate partners, with Coutts (16%) and Lloyds Banking Group (15%) in positions two and three respectively.


Here’s what some of Tesco Bank’s mentors had to tell us about their experiences.

Helen Krushave - Head of Compliance

What inspired you to become a mentor?

I received invaluable support from my own WIBF mentor, who has acted as a sounding board through my transition to managing a new team. I am very thankful for that support: seeing the benefits was my main inspiration. I also wanted broader experience of supporting others. I wanted to get to know someone different. I really enjoy people management and find that getting to know a range of different personalities shapes my perspective.

What is your number one piece of advice to anyone who wants to become a mentor?

If you’re a good listener, you can be a good mentor. You don’t need to have all the answers - just allowing the mentee to talk things through can be very helpful. Taking a few notes at the end of a session can be useful for reminding yourself what to ask next time.

What do you think a mentor can gain?

Perspective from someone at a different stage in their career. It can also be valuable to understand different work cultures and experiences. Mentoring is also a great way of developing experience of supporting others in career development. Mentor/ mentee conversations differ from line manager / employee conversations. They are also an opportunity to develop skills in listening and supporting, through a more open and informal relationship.

What is one thing you find most rewarding about the WIBF mentoring programme?

Hearing how well my mentee is progressing in her career.

Ken Murphy - Head of Credit Risk Oversight

What inspired you to become a mentor?

I had a mentor of my own. I really appreciated the independent advice. It gives you the chance to ask difficult questions that you may not necessarily ask your line manager. Plus, the ability for the mentor to be able to give actual role-based advice. I think this is a key aspect of employee development.

What is your Number 1 piece of advice?

Give it a go! You will find the meetings tend to be two-way, with good advice coming back from the mentee.

What do you think a mentor can gain?

You tend to gain another perspective on issues, and sometimes a much more diverse view. It should make you think more about situations.

What is one thing you find most rewarding about the WIBF mentoring programme?

I’ve really enjoyed engaging with others and learning about their respective roles and the difference between companies.

Tess Merrie - UX Designer

What inspired you to become a mentor?

A conversation with Sally McFall (previous Head of WIBF Mentoring. I realised I had certain experience that could benefit others, mainly around making courageous decisions and standing up for what you believe is right.

What is your Number 1 piece of advice?

I approached mentoring with a very open mind and let my mentee define what she wants to learn. I’m learning from my mentee too.

What do you think a mentor can gain?

Listening to someone else’s experience and sharing my own has definitely made me refine my values. I’ve seen how to articulate the advice that is based on them. It is also a great feeling to be able to help someone on their journey.

What is the one thing you find most rewarding about the WIBF mentoring programme?

That my personal experience is now helpful to another person and in turn, their experience is broadening my perspective.

WIBF would like to thank Tesco Bank, and all the financial institutions and individuals who support the programme so generously.

If you have an analytical mind and feel you have something to offer as an active listener, we’d like to hear from you. NB You do not have to be a member to become a mentor. Both potential mentees and mentors, please contact victoria.pringle@wibf.org.uk for an informal discussion.